Modern Grouting Methods


Sand Stabilisers

Material

Grout stabiliser such as Resiblock, a watering can with rose head to apply the grout stabiliser, and a squeegee or long handled paint roller for applying evenly.

Method

Once the normal sand grouting has been installed, the stabiliser is applied to the surface of the pavers and allowed to penetrate the sand in the jointing gaps. The best way to apply is with a rose headed watering can, this ensures that enough of the stabiliser is applied and penetrates into the gaps. A squeegee or paint roller is then used to even out the substance on the surface of the pavers. Once this sealant dries it hardens and leaves a protective coating over the paver, but more importantly it binds and strengthens the sand by filling all the voids between it. The finished effect should be clean and durable. Be careful when applying not to wash any sand out of the joints, as they will stick to the top of pavers and be difficult to remove.

 

Resin Bound Mortars

Material

Quality grouting sand and resin in the correct proportions (premium products like Romex will sell these together). A cement mixer or bucket and drill, with mixing attachment. A Squeegee for pushing the grout into joints and a stiff and soft broom for cleaning after it has dried.

Method

The sand and resin, is best mixed in a cement mixer to ensure all the particles are coated. It can also be mixed in a bucket and mixed with a drill mixing attachment. The mixture is then poured directly onto the surface of the paving, which should be damp. The mix is then swept into all the gaps until they are full, being very liquid at this stage, it easily penetrates both large and small joint gaps. It is then allowed to dry and the excess is swept off with a stiff broom